The Amendment Killer

 

 

Title:  The Amendment Killer

Author:  Ronald S. Barak

Pages:  570

Year:  2017

Publisher:  Gander Hope House

My rating 4 out of 5 stars.

When I took time to look around for a legal thriller to read, after I read the synopsis of this book, I was hooked.  There are many pluses to the way this author writes.  For example, he keeps the focus on the courtroom theatrics as well as the interpersonal relationships, both inside the court and in the various characters’ homes.  The thought that Supreme Court Justices can be blackmailed to vote a certain way for the betterment of one messed up individual was very unique.

The way the justices walked a fine line to save the diabetic daughter of a justice was very engaging.  There are family dynamics that bring tension to the story as well as some lawyers’ spouses’ employment might factor into the kidnapping and hopefully locating the young girl.  Another interesting feature to the novel was the reading of the internal struggles the protagonists had throughout the book.  Then, when you add a political thread in the plot, that really heightened the interest of this reader.

What was fascinating to me was how the antagonist used one cuss word to express his various feelings of anger and frustration and watching him change in the use of his verbiage by the end of the book.  No, this is not a Christian or a clean book; however, it is a well-crafted story.  I have written the author on his website to suggest changing the language in his upcoming books and I hope he will.  I am very thankful that he was able to share his craft without the use of a sexual material at all in the novel.  I believe this author can tell a riveting tale without the use of bad language.

In the spring of this year, another novel of his will be released titled, The Puppet Master.  I may read it, but it depends what is in my TBR pile and life.  Other authors who write legal novels that are clean can be found like Cara Putman and Rachel Dylan, both of whom are excellent story tellers.  For a non-Christian author and publisher, this wasn’t a book to ignore.  I just wanted to see what the new author offered and how he offered his tale for audiences.  I am an eclectic reader and did enjoy this novel plus being able to encourage the author to change just a minute detail to make it even more appealing to people for all walks of life.